History of the Amersham Area

37 – 45 Whielden St

 

All these are listed grade II buildings.

Whielden St in the 1930s (PHO30)

Whielden St in the 1930s (PHO30)

Nos. 37-39 were built in the late 17th or early 18th century in red and grey brick with an old tiled roof.  Above each door the floor-band has been left blank and there are dummy window recesses above the doors.  There is a fine wooden eaves cornice.

No. 41 is a 17th century cottage in red and grey brick.

No. 43 is a larger house with an 18th century front to a 17th century timber-framed building next to the entrance to The Platt.  It has been rendered and colour-washed. It has an old tiled roof with a small dormer window.  (See a more detailed article about 43 Whielden Street produced by the Amersham Society.)

Little Summeries

No. 45 (Little Summeries) is the other side of entrance to The Platt and has old outbuildings behind.  It has an 18th century casing to a 17th century timber-framed house and there are old outbuildings believed to have been used as a chair factory.     (See a more detailed article about 45 Whielden Street produced by the Amersham Society.)     

The family who ran the chair factory was the Avis family.  Between 1841 and 1891 there were five members of the family who were chair-makers.  Nathaniel, the first of the line was working from the 1830s and by 1871 was employing seven men, a large workshop for that time.  The last member of the family pursuing the trade was Charles Avis, to be seen in the picture below of “The Old Chairmaker”, who was still making Windsor chairs in 1924.