History of the Amersham Area

Amersham & District Bus Co.

Christopher Salaman, Hon. Archivist to the Worshipful Company of Carmen, reminds us of another piece of Amersham heritage.  This article was written in 2014 for the Amersham Society Newsletter and is reproduced with permission.

Amersham & District Motor Bus and Haulage Company

garage 1 (4)In four years’ time the original garage of the transport business will celebrate its 100th annniversary.  The building is currently the garage site of CSG Amersham next to Tesco in Old Amersham, and apart from some alteration to the bottom left side of the structure, is very much in original condition as it would have been seen in the early 20th century. In fact the far right side with its characteristic corrugated iron clad doors and roof, and the brick built centre office/administration block, are classic examples of early motor bus garage design.

1932 Dennis "Lancet" pictured outside the "new" Amersham garage with the "old" garage in the background

1935 Leyland Cub 20 seater pictured outside the “new” Amersham garage with the “old” garage in the background

Inside the structure, the garage accommodation, currently used as a car wash, still retains its original tie bars in the roof level. The admin centre block has its original driver’s pay-in window and upstairs the manager’s office too has an air of authenticity that is unique to the period. In fact the whole existing building is worthy of Grade ll Listing. It may seem unusual to find such a semi-industrial building in a town more associated with its medieval heritage, but here it is!  This is one of a very few original early motor bus garages still standing and as such is a splendid example still intact and worth saving.

One of Amershm District's buses (a Tilling-Stevens model) on route 353 to Windsor

One of Amersham & District’s buses (a Tilling-Stevens model) on route 353 to Windsor

Amersham & District were absorbed into the London Transport Passenger Board (LTPB) in 1933 by which time they had a fleet of nearly 50 buses, many of which were subsequently painted and liveried in the latter’s green and cream colours. In the following year a new and much bigger garage was built on what is now the Tesco’s petrol station. The ‘new’ garage stood for nigh on fifty years before finally being demolished for the current Supermarket….but the original garage still stands….

But for how much longer? The ground that this building stands on is currently owned by Tesco and as such is in danger of being sold for re-development!

(My thanks to Jason Holt of B & M for allowing me to see inside this little ‘gem’…….a rare treat indeed!)

See also the article about the model of the garage in the Museum.

This book is on sale at Amersham Museum